Skip Navigation
Connect with Us:

Title I Programs


Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), is designed to help disadvantaged children reach high academic standards.  Title I is designed to provide all children significant opportunity to receive fair, equitable, and high-quality education, and to close educational achievement gaps.  Title I helps State Educational Agencies (SEAs), Local Educational Agencies (LEAs), and schools meet the educational needs of low-achieving students in schools with high concentrations of students from low-income families. Title I, Part A supports schools in implementing either a school-wide program or a targeted assistance program. These programs must use effective methods and instructional strategies that are grounded in scientifically evidence-based research.

 

Title I, Part A

Title I, Part C - Migrant Education Program

LEAs who receive federal funds are required to provide equitable services for eligible private nonprofit school children, teachers, and other educational personnel.  Services provided by the LEAs for private school participants must be designed to meet educational needs and supplement the educational services by the private school.  After consultation, private schools may receive equitable services in Title I, Part A, Title I, Part C, Title II, Title III, and Title IV Part A and B. The LEA must spend the funds on behalf of the the private schools, and the funds must never be given to a private nonprofit school.   

  • In addressing the Needs Assessment for all migrant students for the Statewide Delivery Plan there are several areas of concern that have been identified and placed into federal regulation. The State Comprehensive Needs Assessment, through evaluation of performance data, found and developed eight specific needs of migrant students. 


    Those needs are:

    • Migrant first graders must develop sufficient skills to promote to Grade 2.

    • Migrant students who failed TAKS/STAAR must participate in summer TAKS/STAAR remediation.

    • Migrant middle school students must use learning and study skills appropriate to learning.

    • Migrant middle school students must have timely attention and appropriate interventions related to problems or concerns that are academically and non-academically related.

    • Migrant middle school students must have the necessary homework assistance and tools at home essential for academic success.

    • Migrant secondary students must earn the required core credits for on-time graduation.

    • Migrant secondary students must make up course work they lack due to late enrollment or early withdrawal.

    • Migrant students who migrate outside of Texas in summer months must be served in summer migrant programs through the efforts of interstate coordination.


    The objective of the Migrant Education Program for Region 7 ESC is to ensure that all eligible migrant students residing in our school districts and Charters are properly identified, recruited, and served through supplemental services which effectively address the academic and non-academic needs of our migrant students. 

Title I, Part D

The Title I, Part D, program - The Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent or At Risk was most recently reauthorized under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as amended in 2001. The Title I, Part D, Subpart 1 State agency N or D program was first authorized with P.L. 89-750, the Elementary and Secondary Amendments of 1966. The Title I, Part D, Subpart 2 local educational agency program came into being in its present form with the Improving America Schools Act of 1994.

Title I Part D consists of two subparts:  Subpart 1 (ESSA, Section 1401) and Subpart 2 (ESSA, Section 1421).

  • Under the State Education Agency (SEA) programs (Title I, Part D, Subpart 1), each state receives formula funds based on the number of children in State-operated institutions and per-pupil educational expenditures. Each State's allocation is generated by child counts in State juvenile institutions that provide at least 20 hours of instruction from nonfederal funds and adult correctional institutions that provide 15 hours of instruction a week. The SEA then makes subgrants to State agencies based on their proportional share of the State's adjusted enrollment count of neglected or delinquent children and youth.

    The purpose of Title I, Part D, Subpart 1

    1. To improve educational services for children and youth in local, tribal, and State institutions for neglected or delinquent children and youth so that such children and youth have the opportunity to meet the same challenging State academic standards that all children in the State are expected to meet
    2. To provide such children and youth with the services needed to make a successful transition from institutionalization to further schooling or employment
    3. To prevent at-risk youth from dropping out of school, and to provide dropouts, and children and youth returning from correctional facilities or institutions for neglected or delinquent children and youth, with a support system to ensure their continued education and the involvement of their families and communities

    Sources: Texas Education AgencyThe National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth
     
  • Under the Local Education Agency (LEAs) programs (Title I, Part D, Subpart 2), the SEA awards subgrants to districts with high numbers or percentages of children and youth in locally operated juvenile correctional facilities, including facilities involved in community day programs.


    The purpose of Title I, Part D, Subpart 2 

    1. To support the operation of local educational agency programs that involve collaboration with locally operated correctional facilities
    2. To carry out high quality education programs to prepare children and youth for secondary school completion, training, employment, or further education
    3. To provide activities to facilitate the transition of such children and youth from the correctional program to further education or employment
    4. To operate programs in local schools, including schools operated or funded by the Bureau of Indian Education, for children and youth returning from correctional facilities, and programs which may serve at-risk children and youth.

    Sources: Texas Education AgencyThe National Technical Assistance Center for the Education of Neglected or Delinquent Children and Youth
     

Private Non-Profit

LEAs who receive federal funds are required to provide equitable services for eligible private nonprofit school children, teachers, and other educational personnel.  Services provided by the LEAs for private school participants must be designed to meet educational needs and supplement the educational services by the private school.  After consultation, private schools may receive equitable services in Title I, Part A, Title I, Part C, Title II, Title III, and Title IV Part A and B.   The LEA must spend the funds on behalf of the the private schools, and the funds must never be given to a private nonprofit school.   

Highly Qualified Staff

Paraprofessionals: Properly trained paraprofessionals can play important roles in improving student achievement in Title I schools where they can reinforce and augment a teacher’s effort in the classroom. Unfortunately, studies indicate that paraprofessionals are used in many Title I schools for teaching and assisting in teaching when their educational backgrounds do not qualify them for such responsibilities. Title I of the ESEA, as amended by the NCLB Act requires that paraprofessionals meet higher standards of qualification, and ensures that students who need the most help receive instructional support only from qualified paraprofessionals.

Comparability of Services

The purpose of the State Compensatory Education (SCE) program is to supplement the regular – or basic – education program with compensatory, intensive, and/or accelerated instruction. The program requires Texas public school districts and charter schools to offer additional accelerated instruction to each student who meets one or more statutory or locally-defined eligibility criteria in order to reduce any disparity in performance on assessment instruments administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39 TEC, or disparity in the rates of high school completion between students at risk of dropping out of school and all other LEA students. 

  • Under Section 29.081 of the Texas Education Code (TEC), compensatory education is defined in law as programs and/or services designed to supplement the regular education program for students identified as at risk of dropping out of school. The purpose is to increase academic achievement and reduce the dropout rate of these students.


    The goal of state compensatory education is to reduce any disparity in performance on assessment instruments administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39 TEC or disparity in the rates of high school completion between students at risk of dropping out of school and all other LEA students (TEC Section 29.081.)
     
    State compensatory education funds were authorized by the legislature to provide financial support for programs and/or services designed by LEAs to increase the achievement of students at risk of dropping out of school. State law, Section 29.081, TEC, requires LEAs to use student performance data from the state’s legislatively-mandated assessment instrument known as the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) tests and any other achievement tests administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39, of the Texas Education Code, including norm-referenced tests approved by the State Board of Education to provide accelerated intensive instruction to students who have not performed satisfactorily or who are at risk of dropping out of school.

    Additional information can be found in the State Compensatory Education (SCE) module in the Financial Accountability System Resource Guide (FASRG) and Frequently Asked Questions (PDF, 295KB). 

  • School districts and charter schools with an annual state compensatory allotment of $500,000 or greater must submit district and campus improvement plans to TEA on or before the date that falls 150 days after the final PEIMS midyear resubmission date.


    Expenditures of state compensatory education funds must: 1) support the intent and purpose of the program, 2) be allowable under statute and guidance, and 3) be directly related to specific interventions identified in the appropriate district and campus improvement plans.



    District and campus improvement plans must be reviewed and revised annually. Requirements for plans, including who should be included in the planning process, are found in TEC §11.251 for district-level planning and in TEC §11.253 for campus-level planning.


    Plans for the 2015-2016 school year must be submitted through the AUDIT application in the TEA Secure Environment (TEASE) system on or before Tuesday, July 11, 2017. Please see the FASRG, Module 9, Pages 6-7 for specific instructions on the number and types of plans to submit.



    Access to the TEA Secure Environment (TEASE) system’s AUDIT application is required to upload plans. For technical assistance, contact TEA’s Financial Compliance Division at schoolaudits@tea.texas.gov.


    Refer to the Financial Accountability System Resource Guide, Section 9.2.3 for more detailed information about the campus and district improvement plans and charter instructional plans.

  • This section contains information regarding At-risk Schools and Students.


    The agency’s resources include information on after school programs, which provide supplementary assistance to local reform efforts in raising academic achievement in core subject areas, and information on dropout prevention programs, which address issues related to dropout prevention, high school completion, and college and career readiness. In addition, our state compensatory education page offers information on programs and services designed to supplement the regular education program for students identified as being at risk of dropping out of school.


    There are testing resources available for students, parents and educators in this section as well. The High School Equivalency Program (HSEP) prepares eligible students to pass the high school equivalency (HSE) tests instead of earning a high school diploma. Our Student Success Initiative (SSI) page offers materials have that been developed to help schools implement the SSI grade advancement requirements for student assessments offered in grades 5 and 8.


    Texas also operates many specialized programs that serve at-risk schools and students. Our Communities In Schools of Texas (CIS of Texas) program gives students a community of support and empowers them to stay in school.


    TEA also provides many resources for Title I schools as identified by the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) – more commonly known as the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. These include the Improving Basic Programs Operated by Local Education Agencies effort in Title I, Part A of the ESEA, which provides supplemental funding to state and local education agencies to assist them with high concentrations of students from low-income families. Another program – Title I, Part D, Subparts 1 and 2 – establishes Prevention and Intervention Programs for Children and Youth Who Are Neglected, Delinquent, or At Risk and provides supplemental funding to state and local education agencies to improve educational services to children in facilities for the neglected or delinquent.

Comparability of Services

Comparability of Services is a fiscal requirement for recipients of Title I, Part A funds under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). This requirement is an assessment of services provided at Title I, Part A and Non-Title I, Part A campuses. Local educational agencies (LEAs) that receive Title I, Part A funds must use their state and local funds to provide comparable services at their campuses receiving Title I, Part A funds and their campuses that are not receiving Title I, Part A funds.

If all campuses in an LEA receive Title I, Part A funds, then one of the following conditions is required:

  • State and local funds used to provide services at Title I, Part A campuses are substantially comparable, taken as a whole, at each Title I campus.
  • State and local funds used to provide services at Title I, Part A campuses with higher percentages of low income students are equal to or greater than the services provided at Title I, Part A campuses with lower percentages of low-income students.

Contact Us

Viki Sparks, M.Ed.
Director
vsparks@esc7.net
(903) 988-6840

Tara Evers, M.Sc.
Title I, Part C
tevers@esc7.net
(903) 988-6983

Kerri Brice. M.Ed.
Title I, Part A
kbrice@esc7.net
(903) 988-6719

Marisol Mancha
Title I, Part C
mmancha@esc7.net
(903) 988-6847

Carmen Delgado, M.Ed.
Title I, Part C
cdelgado@esc7.net
(903) 988-6861

Vicki Weatherford, M.Ed.
Title I, Part A & State Comp Ed
vweatherford@esc7.net
(903) 988-6850

Copyright © {{YEAR}}. All rights reserved.

powered by ezTaskTitanium TM