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State & Federal Accountability
Henryett Porter, Ed.D.
(903) 988-6854

Leesa Green, M.Ed.

(903) 988-6715

Julie Gillespie, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6754

Crissy Haynie, M.S.
(903) 988-6762

LaTonya Whitaker, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6741 

English Language Proficiency (ELP) Status
Carmen Delgado, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6861

State Assessment
Leesa Green, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6715

State Assessment Data Validation (DRC-DDV State Assessment)
Leesa Green, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6715

Leavers Data Validation (DRC-LRDV)
Mechelle Carpenter, B.B.A.
(903) 988-6839

Discipline Data Validation (DRC-DDV)
Henryett Porter, Ed.D
(903) 988-6908

Performance-Based Monitoring (PBM)/ Results-Driven Accountability (RDA)
Beverly Beran, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6910

PBM/RDA-Bilingual/ESL
Carmen Delgado, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6861

PBM/RDA-CTE
Mark Parkerson, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6810

PBM/RDA-ESSA
Kerri Brice, M.Ed.
 
(903) 988-6719

PBM/RDA-Special Education 
Beverly Beran, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6910
Residential Facilities Monitoring
Beverly Beran, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6910


State Performance Plan
Beverly Beran, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6910


DMAC
Anita Luff
, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6804

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Support and Guidance

  • Assessment
    • Accountability

Instructional Continuity Planning Framework

  • Additional Guidance
    • Instructional Continuity FAQ

 

ESC 7 Accountability team members stand ready and able to support your school improvement efforts. Well before ratings are released, our team is hard at work providing assistance to support everything from data analysis to root cause determination.

Upon identification (state or federal), campus teams- consisting of (at a minimum) the Principal and Principal Supervisor- receive training on the Effective Schools Framework (ESF), which includes the following levers. Components of the training are primarily conducted in a Face-2-Face setting, with additional information being provided using virtual venues.

1.1.  Effective Leaders

2.1   Effective, Well-Supported Teachers

3.1   Positive School Culture

4.1   High Quality Curriculum

5.1   Objective-driven Daily Lesson Plans with Formative Assessments 

5.3   Data-driven instruction

 

Identified campuses will also participate in an ESF Diagnostic- a collaborative analysis that illustrates the status of campus practices in relation to their alignment with the Framework. Findings are presented as Areas of Strength and Opportunities for Growth, and are used to guide campus decision-making regarding the focus areas for school improvement.

Schools are also provided with individualized support to appropriately engage in required accountability interventions. This includes assistance with data analysis, team meeting facilitation, and development of required Targeted Improvement Plans, Turnaround Plans, and School Improvement Grant requirements. 

 

TEA Division of School Improvement

A-F Resources

TEA login (TEAL)

Texas Turnaround Framework

New TEA Correspondence: Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) Waiver Approval & 2020 State Academic Accountability

 

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Support and Guidance

  • Assessment
    • Accountability

Instructional Continuity Planning Framework

  • Additional Guidance
    • Instructional Continuity FAQ
The ESC 7 Accountability Turnaround team is dedicated to providing district educators and their professional service providers the most current information about state accountability including rules, regulations, and requirements for campuses and districts with an accountability rating of 'F' or whose rating puts them at risk for interventions in the subsequent school year.

A TEAL account is required to access the required intervention submissions in the 
Intervention Staging Activity Manager (ISAM). A separate account is required to access district unmasked data in TEAL Accountability.

Resources

 

 

 

Parent and Family Engagement

Region 7 ESC is committed to helping parents and schools build partnerships that benefit students and improve educational opportunities.  Every research study on parental involvement done over the past 20 years reached the same conclusion:  when parents are involved in their child’s education that child’s self esteem and academic achievement improve. Through the Parent Involvement Initiative and the Parent Coordination Network, Region 7 ESC seeks to support both parents and schools to improve communication, collaboration, and active involvement to improve student outcomes from preschool to high school, in communities large and small.

In many East Texas schools,  there are only a few students classified as chronically absent, only a few students identified as dropouts, and only a few disengaged students in classrooms. Thankfully, the mindset of most educators in East Texas schools is that “one student is one too many.”  For this reason, numerous, multi-leveled approaches are needed in order to engage parents. One basic strategy for teachers, counselors, and administrators is to meet parents where they are; and go where the parents are to provide support and resources. This is in addition to providing engaging parent activities throughout the school  year. This could include home visits, offering parent training at local agencies and churches, providing outreach at community events, and showing an interest in students' activities outside the classroom.  Another simple strategy is to have regular conversations with parents to highlight and focus on their child's academic and behavior successes, and to share concerns using positive approaches.

  • As a member of the Title I Statewide School Support and Family & Community Engagement Initiative, Region 7 encourages collaboration among all stakeholders that serve children and families and believes the results will promote educational excellence in achievement for all students across the state. Priorities include: 

    1.  Promoting supporting and encouraging engagement of parents at each of the following three parent involvement levels:  
         
            Level 1--This level includes a broad representation of parents who are not frequently visible in schools but make sure their children are prepared mentally, physically and nutritionally with materials and supplies needed for success. 
            Level 2--This level includes a smaller representation of parents who are visible in schools daily, weekly or monthly. These parents assist in a variety of ways at schools (office assistants, library assistance, paperwork, classrooms, discipline, etc).

            Level 3--This level includes an even smaller representation of parents who participate in school planning and governance. This is a group of parent leaders who motivate the involvement of other parents, give input on required parent policies and compacts, lead parent discussions, and give advice on parent needs. 

    Regardless of the level of engagement, parental involvement is needed, appreciated and essential in helping students reach their fullest academic potential. 

    2.  Support for parents, schools and community members as they collaborate to provide the best "village effort" to produce excellent schools in great communities.

    3.  Offer training's that will provide parents, schools and community members the knowledge needed to carry out effective school, parent and community partnerships. 


Engaging Parents Contact

Sherri Wright, M.Ed., Counselor
Coordinator, Federal Programs
swright@esc7.net
(903) 988-6890

Parent and Family Engagement Contact and Title I Contact

Kerri Brice, M.Ed.
Coordinator, Federal Programs
kbrice@esc7.net
(903) 988-6719

Title III Contact

Joseph Pino, M.A.
Bilingual/ESL Specialist, Federal Programs
jpino@esc7.net 
(903) 988-6793

Federal Accountability
The ESC 7 Accountability Turnaround Team is dedicated to providing district educators and their professional service providers the most current information about federal accountability including rules, regulations, and requirements for campuses and districts.

The Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) became law on December 10, 2015, replacing the No Child Left Behind Act on July 1, 2017.  Under the provisions of Texas Education Code (TEC), Chapter 39, the state is required to provide interventions to improve identified low-performing schools. The ESSA statute increases the flexibility and decision-making authority afforded to states, encourages states and schools to be innovative, and holds states accountable for results.  ESSA provides a unique opportunity for the Texas Education Agency (TEA) to chart a path for shifting key decisions related to school improvement, funding, and resources. Schools are currently identified as indicated:

  1. Comprehensive Support and Improvement Schools: Using the Closing the Gaps domain scaled score, TEA rank orders the scaled domain score for all campuses.
  • The lowest five percent of campuses that receive Title I, Part A fund
  • Any Title I or non-Title I (ineligible for funding) campus that does not attain a 67 percent four-year federal graduation rate for the all students group
  • Any Title I campus identified for targeted support and improvement for three consecutive years for the same student group(s) is identified the following school year.
  1. Targeted Support and Improvement (annual identification)
  • Campuses (that are not Comprehensive Support) that have at least one "consistently under-performing" student groups: A student group that misses the targets in at least the same three indicators, for three consecutive years.
  1. Additional Targeted Support (annual identification)
  • Campuses for which an individual student group’s percentage of evaluated indicators met is at or below the percentage used to identify that campus type for Comprehensive Support and Improvement (that is not identified for comprehensive or targeted support)

Helpful Links


Federal Programs Contacts
Viki Sparks, M.Ed.
Director, Federal Programs
vsparks@esc7.net
(903) 988-6840
Sherri Wright, M.Ed.
Coordinator, Federal Programs
swright@esc7.net
(903) 988-6809

Kerri Brice, M.Ed.
Coordinator, Federal Programs
kbrice@esc7.net
(903) 988-6719

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

In a time when schools are being held accountable to the highest level of standards, strong leadership is critical for a school's success.

As principals develop their own professional knowledge and thinking, they gain a deeper appreciation of the conditions teachers need if they are to achieve and sustain improvements in the learning of each student. While teachers are responsible for ensuring that all students achieve to the best of their ability, they will be supported in their work by their principals' deep knowledge about teaching and learning.


  •  

 

Texas Teacher Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS) is the Commissioner Recommended teacher evaluation system for the state of Texas starting in the 2016/2017 school year. Upon conclusion of the three-day face-to-face training, appraisers must successfully complete the online certification test to assume the role of certified appraisers.

T-TESS strives to capture the holistic nature of teaching – the idea that a constant feedback loop exists between teachers and students, and gauging the effectiveness of teachers requires a consistent focus on how students respond to their teacher’s instructional practices. The appraiser has a vital role in assessing teaching proficiency and ensuring that teachers and administrators derive reliable and meaningful information from the teacher evaluation process. By providing evidence-based feedback, appraisers help teachers and administrators make decisions that support efforts to improve instructional quality and student performance.

Before conducting an appraisal, an appraiser must be certified by having satisfactorily completed these state-approved requirements:

  • Advancing Educational Leadership (AEL) Certification
  • T-TESS Appraiser Training
  • Success on the T-TESS Certification Examination

 

Please visit the Teach for Texas website for access to T-TESS Rubric Training videos. These videos are designed to help you gain a deep understanding of each of the domains and the dimensions within the domains in order to effectively improve instructional practice.

The intended purpose of the Texas Principal Evaluation and Support System is to assess the principal’s performance in relation to the Texas Principal Standards. The evaluation should take place in a collegial and non-threatening manner. The principal will take the lead in conducting the evaluation through the use of self-assessment, reflection, and input gathered from various stakeholders with an interest in the leadership of the school. The evidence and documentation gathered by the principal is not intended to become a portfolio. Rather, it should provide a basis for self-assessment, goal setting, professional development planning, and demonstration of performance on specific standards. A standardized principal evaluation system will:

  •     serve as a measurement of leadership performance,
  •     guide leaders as they reflect upon and improve their effectiveness,
  •     focus the goals and objectives of schools and districts as they support, monitor, and evaluate their principals,
  •     guide professional development for principals,
  •     serve as a tool in developing coaching and mentoring programs for principals, and
  •     inform higher education programs in developing the content and requirements of degree programs that prepare future principals.

As the state of Texas implements the new Texas Teacher Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS), administrators will benefit from training that provides support in the implementation of impactful strategies designed to improve instruction and student performance at the campus and district level. This is where Advancing Educational Leadership (AEL) comes into play. 

The AEL curriculum was developed by education stakeholders across Texas representing universities, education service centers, education preparation programs, and district leaders. The end result was a very interactive, three day training built on five foundational themes and seven distinct soft skills needed for effective leadership. This three-day engaging and research-based training is required for teacher appraisers along with T-TESS evaluation training. 

AEL provides administrators with required skills so that they are knowledgeable in curriculum and instruction, skillful in data gathering and analysis, and able to set goals. It also supports skill-building for conducting effective conferences, team-building, conflict resolution, along with mentoring and coaching. 

 

For additional information and to get started with AEL certification, please visit https://ael.education

To find dates and registration information about upcoming AEL training at ESC 7, please visit our Workshop page.

SLOs are long-term goals for student learning crafted by teachers and administrators. Often working in teams with peer, school, and district support, teachers develop these goals to help define what success looks like for their students and plan backwards to ensure that instruction is purposefully guiding schools, teachers, and students toward a common vision of success.

The SLO process strives to bring together the varied pedagogical considerations a teacher juggle throughout the year – curriculum, instruction, assessment, adjustment, and evaluation. The SLO process encourages and prompts continual reflection and self-assessment so teachers can focus on aligning curriculum, instruction, and student performance.

To find dates and registration information about the SLO training, please visit our Workshop page.

Results-Driven Accountability (RDA)- formerly Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System (PBMAS)


Results-Driven Accountability (RDA) is an automated data system that reports annually on the performance of school districts and charters in four program areas:
Bilingual Education/English as a Second Language (BE/ESL), Career and Technical Education (CTE), Federal Title Programs (ESSA)and Special Education (SPED).


One component of RDA is the special education monitoring process, which includes four types of monitoring: 1) Performance-Based Monitoring of public school districts and charters; 2) approval and re-approval of Nonpublic Schools; 3) cyclical monitoring of other state entities that provide services to students with disabilities; and 4) Residential Facilities Monitoring. The Special Education unit also monitors the correction of non-compliance identified through data submission for the State Performance Plan (SPP).


Data Validation Monitoring (DVM) is another component of the RDA system. This system is designed to monitor the accuracy of data submitted by schools to be used in state accountability and RDA (in the areas of leavers/dropouts, school discipline, and student assessment). Data Validation and Verification (DVV) are on-site reviews conducted by TEA to validate the accuracy of data, and the implementation of the PBM system.

In order to receive notification and access to unmasked accountability data and reports- and following discussion with your superintendent or authorized designee, you will need to request the Accountability application on the
TEA Secure Applications Information (TEAL) webpage. If you are responsible for facilitating or leading 
intervention activities and submitting required reports, you will also need  to apply for the Intervention Stage and Activity Manager (ISAM) application.

Our team is ready to support you with analysis of accountability data and throughout the intervention process.  


Helpful Links


 

Performance-Based Monitoring Analysis System Contacts

Beverly Beran, M.Ed.

Director of Special Education
bberan@esc7.net
(903) 988-6910

PBM-Bilingual/ESL
Carmen Delgado, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6861

PBM-CTE
Adrian Knight, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6810

PBM-ESSA
Kerri Brice, M.Ed.
 
(903) 988-6719

PBM-Special Education 
Beverly Beran, M.Ed.
(903) 988-6910
  • The School Counselor

    Everyone in school communities must advocate for improved school attendance. The school counselor has a key role identifying and focusing on issues behind students’ chronic absences. Taking time to examine data, drilling down to detect causes, and providing support through individual or small group counseling can positively impact changing the patterns of absenteeism.

    American School Counselor Association
    School Counselors Improving Attendance

    SHAC

    Your district School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) may be an untapped resource when preventing and addressing chronic absenteeism. The SHAC members, comprised of parents, community members, school health representatives, and educators, serve as problem-solvers and advisors to school districts on health related issues. Through the collaboration of SHAC, effective health education, age-appropriate behaviors, and injury prevention strategies can provide the end result of decreased absences.

    School Health Advisory Councils

    School Attendance Review Team

    A School Attendance Review Team (SART) is an intervention team that includes teachers, administrators, counselors, and nurses.  Students with frequent absences are referred to the team.  Like a Response to Intervention team, the SART is responsible for developing an individualized plan for improving the student’s attendance.  The consistency the team provides works well for meeting the expectations set in House Bill 2398.

    Expunging Truancy Data per HB 2398

    Chronic Absenteeism in the Nations Schools

    Long Term Consequences of Missing School

     


    Advisory Groups / SHAC Contact

    Sherri Wright, M.Ed., Counselor
    Coordinator, Federal Programs
    swright@esc7.net
    (903) 988-6890

  • “No one cares how much you know until they know how much you care.” This quote is critical for educators, who quickly come to realize the importance of building positive relationships with students and parents. One of the most effective practices to build positive relationships is to show interest and curiosity in students' lives. Relationship ties can then be solidified by using students' topics of interest in class activities and assignments.


    Resources
     


    Building Positive Relationships Contact

    Sherri Wright, M.Ed., Counselor

    Coordinator, Federal Programs
    swright@esc7.net
    (903) 988-6890

  • Research has shown that there is power in building positive relationships with students. Responsive practices and positive relationships can lead to decreases in behavior problems and improved performance. “Low-income students who have strong teacher-student relationships have higher academic achievement and more positive social-emotional outcomes than their peers who do not have a positive relationship with a teacher (Murray & Malmgren (2005).” Responsiveness does not require “adding something” to our already full plate. It only requires increased awareness of behavior in order to respond more effectively.


    Here are few shareable, practical resources to help you jump-start your responsive practices:


    The Power of Positive Relationships


    Educator's Guide to Preventing and Solving Discipline Problems


    3 Tips to make any lesson more Culturally Responsive


    Office Chat: Culturally Responsive Training


    Cultural Responsiveness Contact

    Henryett Porter, Ed.D.

    Assistant Deputy Executive Director of Accountability & School Improvement
    hporter@esc7.net
    (903) 988-6854

  • There is no magic wand or perfected approach to ensure resilience and growth mindset in students. However, having students develop skills for resilience is a great avenue to address common achievement and attendance issues. The ability to be resilient enables students to convert negative aspects of their lives such as peer pressure, lack of support at home, and poverty into fuel to achieve success. Region 7 ESC offers on-going support to help schools promote resilience and growth mindset in students. 

    “What is he thinking?” may be a question we ask in regards to a student with chronic absenteeism.  Another question could be, “What is his mindset?”  Some students choosing a pattern of absenteeism may have a fixed mindset.  Characteristics of a fixed mindset:


    • I’m either good at it or not
    • If I fail, I am no good
    • I give up if I find something difficult
    • My abilities determine everything

    Students may be unaware of their mindset, and how it serves as the GPS for the pathway they take.  Psychologist Carol Dweck’s mindset theories call attention to when students with fixed mindsets fail at something, they tend to internalize it as they can’t or won’t be able to do it.  However, when students have a growth mindset that entails believing they can learn more or become smarter if they work hard and persevere, their GPS consistently leads them to school each morning.  As educators reflect on how to reach students who are absent too often, the question “How can growth mindset be an integral part of the school’s culture?” may be an important one to ask.


    Changing the way you think to fulfill your potential


    The New Psychology of Success


    Developing a Growth Mindset


    Resiliency / Mindset Contact

    Sherri Wright, M.Ed., Counselor

    Coordinator, Federal Programs
    swright@esc7.net
    (903) 988-6890

State Assessment

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Support and Guidance

  • Assessment
    • Accountability

Instructional Continuity Planning Framework

  • Additional Guidance
    • Instructional Continuity FAQ

Texas’ student assessment program is designed to measure the extent to which a student has learned and is able to apply the knowledge and skills at each tested grade or course identified in the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS). The state assessment program is fully aligned to the TEKS, the statewide curriculum required to be taught.


Texas has had a statewide student assessment since 1980. In spring 2012, Texas students began taking the State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR®). The assessments are administered to students in grades 3–8 and high school. STAAR, including STAAR Spanish, is available on paper and online. Online versions with designated supports for English learners (ELs) and students with disabilities are also available. 

The state also offers STAAR Alternate 2 for students who have significant cognitive disabilities and are receiving special education services. 

The Texas English Language Proficiency Assessment System (TELPAS) and the TELPAS Alternate are provided to assess the progress that ELs make in learning the English language. 

TEA also provides free, optional, online interim assessments that align to the TEKS. 

 

Resources
 


State Assessment Contacts

 

General STAAR Information

Leesa Green, M.Ed.
Assistant Deputy Executive Director of Accountability & School Improvement
lgreen@esc7.net
(903) 988-6715

STAAR Alternate 2                                    Accommodations
Jenny Montalvo, M.Ed.                               Stacey Perkins, M.A.
Specialist, Special Education                      Specialist, Special Education  
jmontalvo@esc7.net                                   sperkins@esc7.net
(903) 988-6975                                           903-988-6911


 

TELPAS and TELPAS Alternate

Crissy Haynie, M.S.
Coordinator, Accountability & School Improvement
chaynie@esc7.net
(903) 988-6762

 
Student Growth

According to the U.S. Dept. of Ed. (USDE), Student Growth is the change in student achievement for an individual student between two or more points in time, defined as—

• For grades and subjects in which assessments are required under Elementary and Secondary Education Act-ESEA section 1111(b)(3): (1) a student's score on such assessments and (2) other measures of student learning, such as those described in the second bullet, provided they are rigorous and comparable across schools within an LEA.

• For grades and subjects in which assessments are not required under ESEA section 1111(b)(3): alternative measures of student learning and performance, such as student results on pre-tests, end-of-course tests, and objective performance-based assessments; performance against student learning objectives; student performance on English language proficiency assessments; and other measures of student achievement that are rigorous and comparable across schools within an LEA.

Our ESC 7 team goal is to build capacity in the continuous improvement process where student growth lies.  Using the links below, you will find high leverage resources to assist in you with implementation of systems to support positive learning outcomes and academic growth for your students.

The Student Learning Objectives (SLO) process represents a continuous cycle of improvement embodied in strong teaching practice. When quality, standards-based learning goals are created and implemented, students will benefit. This instructional process allows teachers and teacher appraisers to determine and reflect on a teacher’s pedagogical strengths and areas for growth. Implementation of the SLO process satisfies the student performance measure component of the Teacher Incentive Allotment.

On the Texas Gateway  you will find engaging, TEKS-aligned resources that can be used with students as a part of classroom instruction, intervention, acceleration, or additional practice to promote student growth.   It is an online curriculum management system that includes curriculum components, an assessment item bank, and content specific resources aligned to the TEKS (including the Spanish-translated version for K-5 content).

Student Learning Objectives Contact

LaTonya Whitaker, M.Ed.

lwhitaker@esc7.net

903-988-6741

 
Student Performance

Performance is defined as how well the student has prepared for and how well the student has mastered the material presented. Preparation and guidance with the proper standards and additional resources are provided below.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Support and Guidance

  • Assessment
    • Accountability

Instructional Continuity Planning Framework

  • Additional Guidance
    • Instructional Continuity FAQ

Standards / Curriculum
 
Texas Gateway

Online curriculum management system that includes curriculum components, an assessment item bank, and content specific resources aligned to the TEKS (including Spanish translated version for K-5 content).

Performance Reports

 

School Report Cards

Texas Academic Performance Reports(TAPR)

Texas Assessment Management System


Early Childhood Resources                    Student Resources

TEA Pre-Kindergarten Guidelines                                       Student Resources on Texas Gateway


Student Performance Contact

Leesa Green, M.Ed.

Assistant Deputy Executive Director of Accountability & School Improvement
lgreen@esc7.net
(903) 988-6715

 

State Performance Plan (SPP)
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), Section 616(b), requires each state to develop a six-year performance plan. This State Performance Plan (SPP) evaluates the state’s efforts to implement the requirements and purposes of IDEA and illustrates how the state will continuously improve upon this implementation.

TEA and COVID-19, Special Populations

  • COVID-19 Special Education Q&A
  • TELPAS and LPAC Guidance
  • ARD Committee Considerations
  • Guidance for Military Connected Students
  • Guidance for Foster Care Students
  • English Learner FAQ
  • Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 Guidance
  • Special Education Privacy and FERPA Considerations for Virtual Instruction
  • ARD Committee Considerations During COVID-19
  • Evaluation Considerations During COVID-19

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Support and Guidance

  • Assessment
    • Accountability
  • Staff and Educator Issues
    • Guidance on Educator and Issues and Educator Evaluations and Non-renewal

Instructional Continuity Planning Framework

  • Additional Guidance
    • Instructional Continuity FAQ

Thank you and we will see you all tomorrow at 2:30!  Have a great evening!!

  • The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), Section 616(b)(2)(B), requires states to collect data from LEAs annually in order to report data for the SPP/APR and publicly report LEA performance against the state target for the following 14 SPP indicators:

    1. Graduation
    2. Dropout
    3A-C. Adequate Yearly Progress
    4A-B. Suspension/Expulsion
    5A-C. Educational Environment, Ages 6-21
    6. Educational Environment, Ages 3-5
    7A-C. Early Childhood Outcomes
    8. Parent Participation
    9. Disproportionality in the special education program
    10. Disproportionality by specific disability
    11. Child Find
    12. Early Childhood Transition
    13. Secondary Transition
    14. Post-School Outcomes
  • The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004 (IDEA 2004), Section 616(b)(2)(C)(i)(II), requires states to publicly report LEA performance against the state targets in the State Performance Plan. Every LEA will have a district profile that their performance on indicators 1-14 against the state target in the State Performance Plan (SPP).

    SPP Reports and Requirements
  • Pursuant to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 2004 (IDEA 2004) Section 616(a)(1)(C)(i) and 34 CFR §300.608(a), states are required to make “Determinations” annually under Section 616(d) on the performance of LEAs’ programs for students with disabilities. In making such Determinations, the state will assign an LEA one of the following Determination levels: 

    - Meets the requirements 
    - Needs assistance 
    - Needs intervention 
    - Needs substantial intervention

State Performance Plan (SPP) Contact

Beverly Beran, M.Ed
Director, Special Education
bberan
@esc7.net
(903) 988-6910

Child Find, Early Childhood Transition
Donna Holt, B.A., B.S.
Specialist, Special Education
dholt@esc7.net
(903) 988-6896

Early Childhood Outcomes Educational Environment - Ages 3-5
Donna Holt, B.A., B.S.
Specialist, Special Education
dholt@esc7.net
(903) 988-6896

Progress in the General Curriculum
Stacey Perkins, M.A.
Specialist, Special Education
sperkins@esc7.net
(903) 988-6911

Denise Richmond, M.Ed
Specialist, Special Education
drichmond@esc7.net
(903) 988-6902

Disproportionality by Specific Disability,
Disproportionality in the Special Education Program,
Parent Participation
Helen Crissey, M.Ed
Coordinator, Special Education
h
crissey@esc7.net
(903) 988-6977

Beverly Beran, M.Ed
Director, Special Education
bberan
@esc7.net
(903) 988-6910

Dropout, Graduation, Post-School Outcomes,
Secondary Transition
Jackie Reavis, Ed.D.
Coordinator, Special Education
jreavis@esc7.net
(903) 988-6978

Suspension / Expulsion
Audra Hastings, M.B.A.
Specialist, Special Education
ahastings@esc7.net
(903) 988-6908

Teacher Incentive AllotmentRegion 7 ESC supports Region 7 districts and charters with implementation of teacher incentive programs. House Bill 3 (HB 3), passed by the 86th Texas Legislature in June of 2019, established an optional Teacher Incentive Allotment with a stated goal of a six-figure salary for teachers who prioritize teaching in high needs areas and rural district campuses.

Teacher Incentive Allotment (TIA)

HB3 in 30 Video on TIA

Presentation on Teacher Incentive Allotment (PDF)

Additional Resources

·        District Type, 2017-18

·        Cohort A Next Steps and Timelines (PDF)

·        Cohort B Next Steps and Timelines (PDF)

·        Cohort A - B Readiness Checklist (PDF)

·        Cohort C Next Steps and Timelines (PDF)

·        Cohort D Next Steps and Timelines (PDF)

·        Cohort C - D Readiness Checklist (PDF)

·        Teacher Incentive Allotment FAQs (PDF)

Webinar on Readiness Checklist & LOI (Video
Teacher Incentive Allotment Contacts

Leesa Green
Main Contact
lgreen@esc7.net
(903) 988-6715

Marvin Thompson
Finance
mcthompson@esc7.net
(903) 988-6830

Tera Collins-Griffis
National Board for Professional Teaching Standards Certification
tcollins@esc7.net
(903) 988-6772

LaTonya Whitaker
Student Growth/Student Learning Objectives (SLO)
lwhitaker@esc7.net
(903) 988-6741

Julie Gillespie
Teacher Evaluation/Texas Teacher Evaluation and Support System (T-TESS)
jgillespie@esc7.net
(903) 988-6754

Accountability & School Improvement Contacts

Henryett Porter, Ed.D.
Assistant Deputy Executive Director
hporter@esc7.net
(903) 988-6854

Crissy Haynie, M.S.
Coordinator
chaynie@esc7.net
(903) 988-6762

Leesa Green, M.Ed.
Assistant Deputy Executive Director
lgreen@esc7.net
(903) 988-6715

Stacy Morris, M.Ed.
Assistant Director
smorris@esc7.net
(903) 988-6992

Julie Gillespie, M.Ed.
Coordinator
jgillespie@esc7.net
(903) 988-6754

LaTonya Whitaker, M.Ed.
Coordinator
lwhitaker@esc7.net
(903) 988-6741

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